Established 1997

1-800-320-7140

Invacare Top End Crossfire Titanium Wheelchair

item #: 34896

sku : CRFT

brand : Invacare

Invacare Top End Crossfire Titanium Wheelchair

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Quick Overview

  • Very few nuts and bolts for minimum maintenance and repairs

Description

The Top End Crossfire Titanium is the ultra-lightweight, high-performance rigid custom manual wheelchair you’ve been looking for. The chair’s open frame construction give it a cool, minimalist look. And thanks to no underframe, the chair is a breeze to get into or out of a car. There are very few nuts and bolts to loosen or go out of adjustment, which translates to optimum performance and less maintenance and repairs. The "just where you need" them adjustments are easy and fast.

The ergonomic seat option provides a built-in “sweet spot” that promotes a neutral pelvic position for good posture, as well as better pressure distribution for those with impaired trunk control.

The Crossfire Titanium is a super value. Each wheelchair comes standard with adjustable tension upholstery, high performance wheels and high-pressure tires.

Features

  • Open frame construction
  • No underframe for easy, compact transport
  • Very few nuts and bolts
  • Optimum performance with minimal maintenance and repairs
  • Ergonomic seat option provides a built-in “sweet spot”
  • Adjustable tension upholstery
  • High performance wheels
  • High-pressure tires
  • Free Shipping

Specifications

Weight Capacity 250 lbs.
Product Weight 18.5 lbs.
Seat Width 12" - 20"
Seat Depth 14" - 20"
Seat-to-Floor Height 16" - 21"
Overall Width 19" - 27"
Frame Color Silver
Front Wheel Size 3" - 5"
Rear Wheel Size 22" - 26"
Axle Type Quick Release
Back Height 8" - 20"
Upholstery Type Nylon
Upholstery Color Black
HCPCS K0009
Warranty on Frame One Year Limited
Warranty on Wearable Parts Six Months Limited
Shipping Weight 26 lbs.
Box Length 31"
Box Width 24"
Box Height 24"

Customer Reviews

Configure your Invacare Top End Crossfire Titanium Wheelchair

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It's important for the wheelchair to be fitted properly and be as narrow as possible while maintaining comfort and safety.

This will insure the best performance for navigating tight areas both inside the home as well out in public spaces.

A wheelchair that is too narrow or too wide can cause discomfort. When too narrow, a wheelchair can become restrictive and increase the likelihood of pressure sores, while when it's too wide, becomes more difficult to push due to the angle of the arms from the shoulders to the wheels.

To determine the necessary seat width, measure the rider's widest area of the body and add one inch. This will allow for optimum seat width while maintaining ideal usability, comfort and safety.

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Front seat height is measured from the front of the seat to the floor.
Standard seat to floor height is 19.5". Hemi height (a lower seat) is usually 17.5

 

To determine the appropriate seat height, measure from the bend of the knee to the bottom of the foot. Subtract the height of the seat cushion if one is being used. If the wheelchair is not being self propelled by the feet, also add about 2 inches to allow for foot clearance.

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Rear seat height is measured from the back of the seat to the floor.

A chair's rear seat-to-floor height is most commonly set at a height 1" lower than the front seat height.

The rear of the seat is generally set at lower height than the front of the seat to prevent sliding forward.

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To determine a chair's back height, measure from the seat upholstery (at the seat rail) to the top of the back upholstery.
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Easy to overlook, casters are critical to the performance of a wheelchair. Casters are the small front wheels of the wheelchair. They allow the wheelchair to steer and turn in any direction by rotating on its vertical axle.

Casters typically come in sizes from 3"" to 8"". The smaller the caster the better the maneuverability of the chair and the less likely it is to shimmy. But smaller casters on unpaved surfaces, riding in and out of elevators, or passing over street grates can be more problematic. Smaller casters are typical of chairs used for sports like basketball, which is played on an even, hard surface, yet their maneuverability makes them popular for everyday use. 3"" casters require the most riding skill and may not be the best choice for a first time wheelchair user.

The large 8", pneumatic (air-filled) caster provides the softest ride and easily rolls over bumps and raised surface, yet makes propelling the chair more difficult. Because of their size, 8"" casters can be an obstruction coming into contact with furniture or the rider's foot. Pneumatic tires need to be kept inflated with the correct pressure, and are capable of going flat.

4" to 6" casters offer a good combination of maneuverability, performance and ease of riding over surface obstructions. Composite (airless) casters offer better durability and quicker ride, while pneumatic casters provide a softer, slower experience.

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Camber Angle is the off-vertical tilt of the rear wheels. It is adjusted to control maneuverability, speed and stability.

The greater the camber angle, the further the distance between the bottom of the rear wheels and the closer the distance between the top of the wheels. Increasing the camber angle provides the rider with increased maneuverability and stability, but also increases the overall width of the wheelchair.

Typically 0-3 degrees of camber is considered standard for everyday use to accommodate narrow doorways and aisles. A higher camber angle is useful for sporting activities such as basketball where added stability and maneuverability is desired.

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Wheel locks, also known as brakes are used to keep the wheelchair in a stationary position, for example, while traveling on public transportation and for safe transfers in and out of the chair.

Using wheel locks as a braking device can cause injury and excessive tire wear and should never be used in this manner.

There are various types of wheel locks available:

1. Push-to-lock wheel locks are the most common. The break is engaged by the rider pushing forward and applying pressure with the palm of their hand until the lever snaps into position.

2. Pull-to-lock wheel locks work in the same manner as the push-to-pock except the lever is pulled forward. For some riders, it may be easier because it does not require as much upper body mobility needed to push the lever away from the body.

3. Swing-away, low-mount and under-mount wheel locks work in different ways depending on the style. These wheel locks help you avoid hitting your thumbs when pushing directly on the tires by mounting the wheel locks away from this range of motion. Due to its location, some riders with limited mobility may not be able to engage these wheel locks.

Wheel lock extensions provide a greater lever arm to apply and remove the locking mechanism, making the wheel locks easier to engage for a rider with decreased upper strength.

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Measure from the front of back post at the seat tube to the center of the rear axle.
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$2,519.00
Qty:

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1-800-320-7140

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Built to Order

We're sorry, but we can not accept returns on this item, as it is "built to order."

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