Accessible Adventures: Help Your Patient with Physical Disability to Enjoy the Outdoors

Everyone needs to experience at least one outdoor adventure in their lifetime. It’s a fun escape from the mundanity of our everyday lives. 

A study published in the Environmental Research, Volume 166  highlighted the benefits of spending time in forests or parks. The study found that people who spent more time in green spaces had lower risks of chronic illnesses like type II diabetes.  

 Unfortunately, going outdoors also poses a considerable challenge for people with limited mobility. Not every park or hiking trail is wheelchair-accessible or disabled-friendly. If you’re taking care of someone with limited mobility, here’s what you can do to help them enjoy the beauty of nature.

Getting the Right Equipment

Getting suitable equipment to support your patient is crucial for their comfort during a trip or hike outdoors. Not every scooter, wheelchair, or crutch can be used on the trail. Have them invest in a good all-terrain scooter or wheelchair if they plan on making their nature trips a regular thing. Make sure you have the right tools when lifting your patient off a wheelchair to avoid any injuries.

Finding a Suitable Destination

Accessibility upgrades for national parks are relatively new. The National Park Service’s (NPS) Accessibility Task Force was formed in 2012. In 2015, the group drafted a five-year plan to make all national parks accessible. It’s been about four years since the plan was enacted, and a number of popular destinations under the NPS have made great strides in upgrading their facilities to welcome everyone.

 

The Grand Canyon

One of these places is the ever-famous Grand Canyon National Park in Arizona. This historic landmark is wheelchair-accessible. Its shuttle buses have ramps that can carry passengers with mobility equipment. However, some motorized scooters might not fit on the vehicle, so you better check ahead. The park also offers a “scenic drive accessibility permit” that allows physically disabled visitors to go to places that are closed to public traffic.

 

 

Yellowstone National Park

Yellowstone National Park is another popular destination that’s working to be universally accessible. Most of its trails are wheelchair-friendly, though its staff is still trying to eliminate barriers in some areas. The park allows motorized personal vehicles, stand-up devices, and service animals. Its “NPS Yellowstone National Park app” has updated accessibility information that people can use to plan their trail.

 

Glacier National Park

Accessibility improvements are also being made for Glacier National Park. This has a wonderful view of the rocky mountains of Montana and its gorgeous Avalanche Lake. Park management recommends calling them in advance for a special program that lets disabled guests enjoy the place without worrying about hazards. The destination also has accessible shuttles that lead to various campgrounds, lakes, and lodging.

 

It’s smart to get an “Access Pass” from the government. This allows U.S. citizens who have a permanent disability to enter over 2,000 federal recreation sites (like parks) free of charge.

Wrap-Up: Testing Their Limits

While it’s a great experience for you and your patient to see the beautiful views and scenery in forests and national parks, it takes a little preparation before they can take the trip and enjoy the hike. Get them ready by strolling with them around the neighborhood to see how long they can stay outside without feeling too exhausted.

Once you find their limit, you can ask for longer or shorter hiking trails and programs from your park of choice. With a little creativity and the NPS’ continued efforts, it won’t be long before the outdoors can truly be a place for everyone.

Get a Reliable Patient Lift

It can be difficult to lift your patient from their wheelchair to another place they can rest on while you’re on an outdoor trip. Here at 1800wheelchair.com, we offer manual and electric motor patient lifts that help with this challenging task. With over a decade of experience in helping the elderly with their mobility challenges, we’re here to help you move your patients safely and with ease.

 

Call us today to learn more about our mobility products.

Accessible Travel: Exploring the World When You Have a Physical Disability

Air travel has its set of challenges for people with disabilities (PWD), despite industry efforts to make air travel easy for them. Sure, there’s the American Disabilities Act that requires facilities in the U.S. to be accessible for everyone, but it’s a different story when you’re going to another country. This is why you need to make the necessary preparations to ensure a smooth flight — and vacation.

Here are a few tips for PWDs who want to explore the world.

Following Air Travel Guidelines

Let’s face it, getting a fabulous air travel experience is rare unless you’re in first class. It’s important to call the airline you’re planning to book for your trip. U.S. airlines like United have a disability desk you can call to assist you with any special needs, like a therapy animal or a mobility scooter for seniors. Every airline in the U.S. has a disability policy on its website, as well. Read them, fill out the necessary forms, and notify your airline for any special requests you may have.

Choosing an Accessible Destination

As much as you want to experience all the world has to offer, not every country is completely accessible. Wheelchair user and avid traveler Cory Lee, in his website “Curb Free with Cory Lee,” recommended wheelchair-accessible places to visit. South Korea was number one on his list because of his recent visit there during the 2018 Winter Olympics and Paralympics. He reported that its capital, Seoul, and the Olympic host city Pyeongchang are ideal for wheelchair users.

 Accessible travel guide WheelchairTravel.org also stated that the capital has the world’s best public transportation when it comes to accommodating wheelchair users and other PWDs. Planning a Euro-trip? Make Vienna your first stop. Most of its tourist destinations are accessible to wheelchair users. Its Albertina museum provides full access for those using wheelchairs. It even offers guided tours for people who are deaf, blind or have slight to moderate dementia. If you’re looking for a regal experience, the city’s Forchtenstein Castle has wheelchair-accessible restrooms and restaurants. They offer a 50% discount on the admission price.

Hitting the Road Instead

If airline travel is just too much of a hassle for you, you can always have a nice road trip with family and friends. Lee suggested going to the sunny city of Orlando, Florida. He credited the place for having “flawlessly flat” roads and great entertainment destinations like Walt Disney World, Seaworld, and Universal Studios. What’s great is that all these theme parks are accessible!

The U.S.’ capital, Washington, D.C., is also a prime choice for wheelchair users, according to WheelChairTravel.org. It’s filled with historical monuments. It has magnificent architecture and public transportation. The city’s Natural Gallery of Art offers beautiful paintings from renowned authors like Leonardo da Vinci and Rembrandt. If you’re looking to learn a thing or two about science and history, the Smithsonian Museums (Air & Space, American History, and Natural History) provide full access for those using wheelchairs and other persons with disability.

Traveling with a physical disability might be difficult, but the rewards are worth it. All it takes is preparation and resourcefulness. With the increasing number of countries and American cities making their public transportation systems and buildings accessible, you’ll be checking off all your travel goals in no time.

Get the Right Mobility Scooter for Your Travels

When it comes to traveling, you want your mobility scooter to be light and durable. Here at 1800wheelchair.com, we offer sturdy but portable power scooters like the award-winning eFoldi, which has a battery designed for air travel. We also provide walkers, patient lifts, and wheelchairs for all ages. Explore the world with us.
 

Contact us today to know more about our mobility products.

Keep Your Mobility Scooter Working: A Maintenance Checklist

Seniors and people with physical disabilities have to deal with limited mobility every day. This can hinder their ability to complete daily tasks and increase their risks for slips and falls, which can cause serious injuries. Fortunately, there are mobility aids, like electric scooters, that can improve the quality of their life and minimize their risks of accidents.

 

Electric mobility scooters, however, require proper maintenance and the right accessories to keep them in excellent condition and prolong its lifespan. Otherwise, you’ll lose not only your investment, but also your or your loved ones chance to live independently amid mobility issues.

 

Self-Reliance with a Properly Functioning Mobility Scooter

 

A well-kept scooter provides several benefits that significantly improve the lifestyle of users. These include the following:

  • Lowering the risk of falls. A scooter allows seniors or physically challenged individuals to move around without the risk of falling. Falls can lead to injuries that can cause further complications.
  • Encouraging individuals to stay active. One major purpose of a mobility scooter is to provide users with the independence to move around indoors and outdoors. The ability to move independently can motivate them to stay active, which promotes better wellbeing.
  • Less hospital stays. A mobility scooter helps users avoid injuries, which can save money on costly hospitalization.
  • Making shopping more convenient. Errands become easier with a mobility scooter. You or your loved one can head to the mall or the neighborhood store to get supplies for the house without relying on further assistance from friends or family.

 

Maintenance Tasks to Prioritize

 

Knowledge of proper maintenance ensures the scooter will last for as long as it’s necessary, even with daily use.

Here are some maintenance tasks that you should do:

  • Check the batteries. You should know what type of battery your scooter has to determine the right maintenance method. Some batteries must be discharged completely before recharging, while others can be recharged anytime.
  • Clean your device at least once a week. You may use a damp cloth to clean the surface. There are also special cleaners designed for cleaning mobility scooters. Avoid damaging the surface when cleaning.
  • Consider getting the device serviced once a year. It’s vital to the health of your scooter if a professional will check on it at least once a year. A professional can spot any problem that needs an immediate solution before it gets worse.
  • Read the manual. Some users would skip this part, but the manual has maintenance instructions specific to the brand and the type of scooter (e.g., three-wheel, heavy duty, or portable). It may also contain guidance on common signs that indicate your scooter may break down.

 

Invest in High-Quality Accessories

 

Apart from proper maintenance, the right accessories can help you protect your mobility scooter against various elements. These can contribute to extending the lifespan of your mobility aid. Some accessories, like scooter lifts, also make it convenient for you to carry your scooter.

Here at 1800wheelchair.com, we offer different mobility scooter accessories to help or your loved one maximize the use of a mobility aid. You can choose from our selection of bags, covers, and lifts, among others that fit your needs. We use only durable materials to meet your requirements.

 

Contact us for further information.

Transportation for Seniors : Improving Quality of Life for Your Loved Ones

Aging may affect a persons ability to move freely and travel from one place to another because of muscle loss, joint stiffness, and balance issues. Mobility problems can also occur in people who have developed certain diseases, such as Alzheimers, Parkinsons, and other similar conditions.

 

There are equipment pieces that can provide seniors with assistance, including wheelchairs and electric scooters designed for the elderly. Transportation, however, can be difficult for seniors with mobility problems. This may prevent them from visiting their doctors or running important errands.

 

Current Transportation for Seniors

 

Younger members of your family can drive your senior loved ones when they need to go somewhere, like for a checkup, shopping, or visiting a relative or a friend. But there will be times that you may not be free to give them a ride. If this happens, your loved ones may rely on other transportation options.

 

Seniors can take public transportation, including buses, subways, light rails, and others. Most buses can accommodate wheelchairs and mobility scooters, too. And some transportation also offers discount fares or coupons for seniors. The availability of these options varies depending on your area. Not all cities, unfortunately, have public transportation designed with people who have limited mobility.

 

Improving the Quality of Life of Seniors

 

Mobility scooters are helpful equipment for seniors with limited mobility. These allow them to move around either at home or outdoors. Staying in one place for a long time can be depressing for seniors, that’s why they should be able to move more despite their condition.

Investing in quality scooters provides several benefits, including:

  • Prevention of falls. Seniors, especially with mobility problems are more prone to slips and falls. These can cause bruises and broken bones. In some cases, falls can lead to head and neck injuries. Scooters reduce these dangers, keeping seniors safe.
  • Convenient shopping. Mobility scooters make shopping easier for seniors, especially if they go to big shopping malls. They can enjoy their time with family and friends without worrying about fatigue and falls.
  • Improves caregivers lives. Scooters are not only beneficial to seniors, but they also benefit caregivers. Looking after seniors can overwhelm caregivers over time. Since scooters allow seniors to move independently, caregivers can focus on other chores.

 

Choose a Scooter Based on Your Loved Ones Needs

 

There are various types of mobility scooters in the market, which come in a range of features. Selecting one for your senior family member will mean understanding their needs.

A three-wheel mobility scooter, for example, fits indoor use. They usually have a smaller turning radius, depending on the size of its tires. Some of these scooters also come in different driving range and weight capacities. A four-wheel mobility scooter, on the other hand, has a bigger turning radius, making it ideal for outdoor use.

 

There are also portable varieties that you can disassemble and place in a car trunk. Some of these scooters also come in different driving range and weight capacities.

At 1800wheelchair.com, you can find a wide range of scooters. We carry different designs and style to match the individual needs of your senior loved ones. Our products suit different purposes, like shopping, strolling in the park, or moving around the house.

 

Call our representatives for more information or order online today.

Helping Someone with Limited Mobility Accomplish Everyday Chores with Ease

The sight of a person on a wheelchair brings misconceptions. Many non-disabled individuals assume wheelchair users are severely sick, have mental conditions, or cannot walk completely. While this may be true in some cases, many wheelchair users can function well enough. The only reason they need a wheelchair is that they have limited mobility. The wheelchair helps them get on with their everyday activities.

 

Many wheelchair users can accomplish the following chores despite their conditions, proving that they can get by with their mobility issues:

  1. Vacuuming with a handheld cordless vacuum
  2. Sweeping with a lightweight broom
  3. Gardening on an elevated bed planter
  4. Cleaning dishes with a dishwasher
  5. Doing the laundry with a front-loading washing machine
  6. Prepping meals on a height-adjustable work surface
  7. Creating shopping lists and grocery inventory
  8. Keeping track of finances and budget
  9. Paying bills online or through digital means

 

In 2016, approximately 1.85 percent of the world’s population required a wheelchair, according to the Wheelchair Foundation. That percentage translated to about 131,800,000 people.

 

Making the Home Wheelchair-Friendly

 

With more people requiring wheelchairs, it’s time for home builders and contractors to design residential structures that adapt to the needs of these individuals. Family members must also keep these needs in mind when thinking of the layout of the home, to accommodate the wheelchair user.

 

Start with the doorway and the ramp. The Americans with Disabilities Act sets the standard for doorway width, which should allow a wheelchair to enter or exit, as well as maneuver easily. Family members or landlords must also simplify the interior layout to facilitate wheelchair movement and maintain the safety of the disabled resident. Here’s how:

  1. In the kitchen, invest in wall ovens instead of standard floor units. To help wheelchair users see the contents of pots and pans while cooking, place mirrors where necessary. Still, though these handy tools are available, someone should assist the wheelchair user cook to ensure safety.

 

  1. Remove unnecessary objects from the living room, so there will be fewer items to dust and clean. Also, furniture should be strategically positioned to allow for wheelchair access.

 

  1. In the laundry room, place all hampers, detergents, and other laundry materials in one reachable place so that the wheelchair user doesn’t have to go back and forth to fetch things. Opt for non-slip flooring in this part of the house.

 

  1. Place storage cabinets on the floor in kitchens, laundry rooms, and washrooms. Make sure they have side openings for easy access to stored items.

 

While the wheelchair is a part of who they are, wheelchair users are not defined by their wheelchairs or their conditions. Friends and family should not be quick to dismiss their interest to help out around the house. Instead, they should encourage these individuals to find something valuable or meaningful to do. When wheelchair users are not pitied or treated differently, they can start feeling like 98 percent of the population.

 

If you or your loved one is looking for a place to buy a wheelchair to help with your loved one’s mobility needs, you’ve come to the right site. Here at 1800wheelchair.com, we offer various wheelchairs that suit your unique needs.

 

Talk to us today for any questions and subscribe to our newsletters for exclusive deals.

The New York Subway: Why it’s Inaccessible for People in Wheelchairs

 

Getting around New York is a challenge everyone in a wheelchair has to face. Using a portable aluminum wheelchair ramp is helpful, but there’s a great need for the city to become accessible for all.

 

Inaccessibility: The Subway Challenge

 

There are many accessible spots in New York. But the subway is one of the culprits for challenging accessibility in the city. Subways in other states are accessible; all stations in Washington are wheelchair-friendly, in Boston, it’s 74 percent of the stations and 67 percent in Chicago.

 

The New York Times reports that it’s not just New Yorkers in wheelchairs who struggle with using the mass public transportation system. Other commuters, like parents with strollers and travelers with luggage, find the subway difficult to navigate.

 

The main problem: the elevators in the subway stations. Only about a quarter of the 472 subway stations in New York are wheelchair accessible. It’s a low percentage for any major transit system across the globe.

 

The small number of elevators isn’t the only problem because many of them don’t work. Every subway elevator malfunctions on an average of 53.2 times a year. Although some of the elevators work, commuters then have to deal with the issue of foul odor and the inaccessible location of the elevators, typically at the far end of a narrow platform.

 

The Hope of a Wheelchair-Friendly City

 

Access is one of the defining issues that many persons with disabilities (PWDs) across the world face. It’s either a shop has too large steps or raised doorframes, or worse, has no wheelchair ramp.

 

Small wonder then that PWDs are less likely to mingle with other people or worked. Of course, the law requires cities and any establishment or property to provide wheelchair accessibility. The mandate doesn’t only benefit PWDs; it’s good for the economy, too.

 

With wheelchair-friendly transportation, people in New York, from residents to tourists, will have more confidence to explore the city. PWD employees will also find it easier to go to work, helping businesses meet their goals.

 

New York, however, is still on its way to becoming one of the most accessible cities for those with disabilities. Funding is hard to come by for the city’s transportation system, and when it does, it is usually diverted to new cars or signal improvements. Gabriel Amari, supervisor for the Brooklyn Center for Independence of the Disabled, also points out that money for the subway is usually insufficient.

 

Although mass transportation needs further improvements to be wheelchair-friendly, you don’t have to be limited when traveling.

 

 

A Portable Wheelchair Ramp Can Help

 

At 1800wheelchair.com, we have a variety of portable wheelchair ramps. Our products can make it easier and better for people in wheelchairs to get around the city. The ramp system offers a semi-permanent yet durable solution to inaccessible places, including homes without wheelchair access.

 

Choose from our selection and find the right length and weight you need. Some will come with their own bag, allowing for further convenience.

Contact us today for more information.

 

10 Technologies that Are Redefining Disability Right Now

Advances in technology affect all kinds of people, but this sort of progress can truly transform the lives of those with physical and mental disabilities. From mind-controlled exoskeletons to driverless cars, the past couple of years have been a windfall for accessible tech and we’ve compiled a list of 10 exciting innovations that are already redefining disability.

Mind-controlled Exoskeletons

We’re kicking things off with what may just be the most sci-fi sounding entry on the list. Bafflingly, when a 29-year old paraplegic man named Juliano Pinto kicked the ceremonial first ball at the 2014 World Cup using a mind-controlled exoskeleton to help him walk/kick, it didn’t make for major headlines. What should have been frontpage news was mentioned in passing, but it was an incredible achievement that would have seemed implausible just a short time ago.

Eye-controlled Wheelchairs

From mind control to eye control. There’s no more intuitive way to pilot anything than with your eyes. There have actually been several successful eye-controlled wheelchairs in the past couple years, but one of the most promising systems was the Eyedrivomatic, developed by Patrick Joyce, a 46-year old British inventor with motor neurone disease. The technology gives the old “watch where you’re going” refrain a whole new meaning.

Accessible Clothing

Unfortunately, those with disabilities are often forced to use goods and services designed for the non-disabled population and adapt them to their particular situation. In recent years, however, there has been a boom in accessible fashion, and companies like IZ have created fun, fashionable clothing lines truly catered to the disabled community.

3-D Printed Limbs

As we mentioned earlier, 3-D printing is a godsend for accessibility and we’ve seen the technology work wonders in the field of prosthesis. We’ve seen custom-made, 3D-printed arms and legs help folks navigate and manipulate the world around them and but Alex Pring’s prosthesis takes the cake. The 7-year old, Central Florida boy was gifted with a 3-D printed version of his favorite superhero’s arm and Iron Man Robert Downey Jr. delivered it to him in person.

Wheelchairs that Climb Stairs

Stairs: The bane of every wheelchair user’s existence. That may soon change, however, as several stair-climbing wheelchairs are currently in development with a few already in production. One of the most promising is Scalevo, the brain-child of a team of students at ETH Zurich and the Zurich University of the Arts. While ramps are still integral to accessible design, this technology may soon provide wheelchair users with a way of tackling a previously insurmountable obstacle.

Driverless Cars

Tesla Motors and Spacex CEO Elon Musk has thrown substantial weight behind this idea and recently made waves by saying that Tesla could have a commercially-available driverless car within two years. Why is this technology accessible? It allows those with disabilities that leave them unable to drive traditional cars to own and operate their own vehicles. That sort of mobility could be life-changing for thousands, perhaps millions around the world.

Accessibility Maps

Sadly, many major cities around the world lack accessible public transportation and infrastructure, but in recent years, a host of dedicated applications have aimed to make it easier to navigate a frustratingly inaccessible world. Case in point, Jason DaSilva’s AXS Map, which maps accessible locations around the US and uses community input to rate them from their friendliness to those with disabilities.

“Smart” Wheelchairs

These days, it seems everything is “connected,” and wheelchairs have benefitted from that revolution. Just like TVs, cars, and a host of other technologies, wheelchairs have gotten “smarter” in recent years and some models can now store and connect to a user’s health history, monitor their vital signs, and even send out distress calls in case of emergency.

Virtual Reality

Virtual reality was once a staple of science fiction, but of late, it has been a hot topic in the real world. Head-mounted VR sets like Occulus VR’s Occulus Rift provide an immersive experience and wide commercial availability could make VR the talk of 2016. While the technology is still in its infancy, it could soon provide disabled users with virtual access to a variety of experiences that would otherwise be inaccessible. It has become cliche to say, but the future truly is now.

Wheelchairs for Animals

Human wheelchairs are a time-tested, age-old invention, but in the last few years, we’ve seen an influx of wheelchairs designed to accommodate both furry and not-so-furry friends. 3-D printing could very well have its own entry on the list, but the technology has allowed inventors to cheaply produce highly specialized mobility devices for dogs, cats, turtles, guinea pigs, and even goldfish.

How to Prepare for Colder Weather When Living with a Mobility Issue

As much of the nation is headed into, if not already feeling, the coldest time of the year, it’s a good idea to make sure that anyone who uses mobility equipment such as knee walkers or wheelchairs are fully prepared. Depending on the severity of your mobility needs, winter preparedness can vary from case to case, but there are some basic steps you can take to be sure you enjoy a safe winter.

Make arrangements with family members or an aid for help.

If you are in a situation where you already have a visiting or live-in aid that helps with your needs, take the time to go over safety needs for cold and nasty weather. If you don’t have such ready assistance, contact family members or friends to ask if they would be willing to be called upon in the event that you need extra assistance during these cold months.

Allow extra time for your travels.

While many people facing mobility issues already have to factor extra time in for their travels, winter traveling may require even more added time. The threat of treacherous sidewalks, slow and cautious traffic, and even stalled cars means that winter travel can be unpredictable and dangerous. Be sure you allow yourself more time to get to where you’re going.

Have a Back-Up Exit Plan.

Winter weather makes it hard for anyone to head out…particularly those that depend on wheelchair ramps to exit their homes. In the event that your usual exit is blocked or inaccessible, try to have a back-up in mind. If there is no available secondary exit in your home, this is another place you can rely on friends or family for help.

Try to get errands and visits done during the daylight hours.

As temperatures drop towards late afternoon, roads become more unpredictable and dangerous. Because of this, check your local weather and try to get all of your errands and travel done during the warmer hours of the day.

Seek Out Special Aid in Your Area

Public shelters and local organizations may offer special aid to those with disability in the event of winter emergencies. Call ahead and check with these organizations, though, as some require registration. Do some digging to see if your community offers this sort of assistance.

Make sure to follow these steps and you should be well prepared for the coming winter.

Top Ten Reasons to Use a Roll About Scooter

When you’re suffering from a broken ankle or foot, you might not exactly be in the most positive mood. After all, you’re lugging around a massive cast – so how can you possibly expect to be excited about using a roll about scooter?

knee-walker

There are precisely ten reasons why you should be pumped about using a roll about scooter (also referred to as a knee walker) – and here they are:

1. Roll about scooters make it so much easier to get around. Unlike crutches (which make you look like you have a massive wingspan) and wheelchairs (which limit the use of your hands), roll about scooters free up your hands and make it easier to get around with your good leg.

2. It’s easier to take all weight off of your injured foot or ankle. A knee walker allows you to rest your knee on a comfortable pad, which supports your body’s weight.

3. A roll about scooter minimizes the chances that you’ll re-injury your foot or ankle. Just try getting that kind of promise from those awkward and weirdly balanced crutches.

4. A roll about scooter makes it easier to grab things from higher shelves and counters. Crutches make it hard for you to use your hands, while wheelchairs force you to live like you’re all of three foot for the next six months.

5. Roll about scooters allow you to move around in your house and office without worrying about carpets, rugs and objects on the floor. Because knee walkers are so stable, you don’t have to worry about slipping and falling due to improper rug placement.

6. Knee walkers make it easier to get in and out of the shower, as you’re already in a standing position.

7. Roll about scooters are more comfortable to use than crutches (after all, who wants to use something that causes armpit blisters?).

8. Knee walkers are more financially-savvy than ever before, as you have the option of simply renting a roll about scooter rather than buying and owning one.

9. It’s easier to isolate your injured foot or ankle with a roll about scooter.

10. It just looks cooler – end of story!

Use these top ten reasons to use a roll about scooter to get pumped about your newfound mobility device!

When you’re suffering from a broken ankle or foot, you might not exactly be in the most positive mood. After all, you’re lugging around a massive cast – so how can you possibly expect to be excited about using a roll about scooter?

knee-walker-2

 

This article was provided by Knee Walker Centeral, they offer Roll About Scooter Rentals.

Wheelchair Ramps for a Handicap Van

Maximizing mobility helps preserve a person in a wheelchair’s quality of life. The process begins with an easily operated wheelchair, ramps and appropriate transportation. Wheelchair ramps make a minivan or full-size van an effective handicap van.
You can also have modifications made to a standard van. Generally, the van’s floor is lowered by about 1 foot. This provides headroom for a person seated in a wheelchair. After removing some rear seats,, one of several different types of a wheelchair ramp is installed in the van.

Benefits of Outfitting a Handicap Van with a Wheelchair Ramp

You can’t always help a loved one in and out of their wheelchair and into and out of a vehicle. The person’s weight or condition may make this difficult or dangerous. In these instances, a wheelchair ramp can make all the difference.
A handicap van outfitted with a wheelchair ramp is practical. It speeds up entry and exiting considerably. Everyone involved appreciates the increased ease and efficiency. It’s especially appreciated during hot, cold, rainy or otherwise inclement weather.

van-with-ramp

Types of Wheelchair Ramps for a Handicap Van

There are four basic types of wheelchair ramps for a handicap van, including; rear-entry, side-entry, fold-out side entry and in-floor side entry. All are helpful. But personal preferences and needs dictate which is best for you. When deciding, consider the configuration of your garage or whether you frequently parallel park on the street, among other logistics.

Rear-entry wheelchair ramp vans come out at the rear hatch door. They are great for narrow garages. They facilitate straight entry and exiting without turning and maneuvering. Side-entry ramps extend out from the rear passenger door. They are safer than rear-entry because they don’t extend into the traffic lane in parking lots. Fold-out ramps also provide safe side-entry. They are a good option for people in wheelchairs who enter and exit the handicap van on their own. In-floor ramps can provide a safe side entry, too. They operate automatically. They stow in the floor to maximize space. These are ideal when the ramp is not often used or when you preferred it concealed.